Maybe this time

On Monday May 25, George Floyd was killed by police at the intersection of 38th and Chicago in Minneapolis. Because the COVID-9 pandemic had caused all my programming to be cancelled, I happened to be at home, 11.6 miles to the south. On Wednesday I went to see the site where a small memorial was taking shape and on Thursday returned with an improvised portable … Continue reading Maybe this time

Dreamers and planners

“You do all these inspiring things,” she said. “I’m just a planner.” I thought for a minute. One of the things I love about A Peace of My Mind is that it lets me drop into different communities and spark interesting conversations. I meet new people and I see the creative ways that people work toward positive change in the world. One of the challenges … Continue reading Dreamers and planners

Howard Zehr

Howard Zehr has been called the grandfather of the restorative justice movement: the notion that justice can be about repair, responsibility and healing rather than just punishment. A retired professor from Eastern Mennonite University, Howard is an accomplished photographer and author who has published several books including Doing Life, a collection of stories and portraits of life term prisoners. “I often talk about three core … Continue reading Howard Zehr

Fiona Orr

Fiona Orr, fifteen-years-old, is home schooled in Fayetteville, Arkansas, where she volunteers regularly at the Omni Center for Peace, Justice, and Ecology where she has found positive adult mentors. Fiona draws and paints. From a very young age, she liked to put beautiful things on paper so that other people could see the same beauty she did. “Yes, you’re one very small person, but you can always make … Continue reading Fiona Orr

Memphis Theological Seminary

Just wrapping up a busy month in Memphis, with American Stories at Memphis Theological Seminary and American Stories at First Congregational Church. I’ve been to Memphis a few times now, and I’m always drawn in by the combination of history, music, food, and good people. I had the chance tp speak at the seminary, and I also set up a studio to ask, “How does … Continue reading Memphis Theological Seminary

Matt Meyer

Matt Meyer is a teacher, author, and peace activist born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He is a longtime member of the War Resisters League and was founding chair of the Peace and Justice Studies Association. Matt views the status quo as unjust and believes that an international movement of radical social change is required to create lasting peace in the world. “Dr. King … Continue reading Matt Meyer

Bud Welch

Bud Welch lost his only child, Julie Marie, in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. She had worked as a translator in the Alfred P. Murrah building for just five months when Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols blew it up in what remains our nation’s largest domestic terror attack. When Bud saw a news clip of McVeigh’s father, he saw a man who was as … Continue reading Bud Welch

Some things don’t work

Eastern State Penitentiary was built as a monastic experience. Originally designed to house 250 prisoners on the outskirts of Philadelphia, it opened in 1829. The prisoners were kept separate. They weren’t allowed to speak. Their single hour of daily recreation took place in the tiny private yard behind each cell, surrounded by tall walls so they wouldn’t encounter another person. Their meals were passed through … Continue reading Some things don’t work

We did it!

Tuesday night was a great celebration of a long effort to produce our new book, A Peace of My Mind: American Stories. Thanks to everyone who came out to Squirrel Haus Arts for the release party. There were people who’ve been in my books, people who helped support and fund the books, friends, family, and more. If I could judge it right from up front, … Continue reading We did it!